Power sockets and plugs in Uruguay

In Uruguay we have a bunch of different electrical power sockets and plugs, so which power travel adapter should you bring? Simple advice from a local.
By Karen A Higgs
electrical adapter uruguay Electricity by Colores Mari (Flickr)
Last updated on August 31, 2016
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In Uruguay, a bunch of different plugs are used. Uruguay is a small country stuck between two industrial giants. So we end up with appliances produced for Brazilian and Argentine markets, with the accompanying different plugs.

So which power plug (travel) adapter should you bring to Uruguay?

This skinny two-pin plug above is by far the most common plug socket in Uruguay. You can’t go wrong if you have this adaptor.

They also fit the skinny three-pin sockets.Obviously the two-pin adaptor is better than a three-pin, because you can use the two-pin plug in an outlet for both two or three pin.

Other sockets which are less common

There are other sockets which you may encounter but less frequently. For instance in our guesthouse all our sockets are the skinny pin kind, except for one fat two-pin in the kitchen.

These fat two-pin plugs (known as a schuko) are most common in Uruguay for kitchen appliances. I see that in Germany you have the same plugs.

These triangular-style three-pin plugs are very common in Argentina, and you may encounter these sockets in some places especially those close to the Argentine border. I see that in Australia the plugs are the same.

So what do electrical sockets look like in Uruguay?

I found this graphic of plugs in Uruguay really helpful.

Forgot your adaptor?

Don’t worry if you forget your adaptor. They are easy to find here. Just go into any large supermarket to pick one up. Your local Uruguayan hardware store, known as a ferreteria (no small furry animal jokes please) will also stock them.

Ask for an “adaptador de enchufe” (say, ad-ap-ta-DOR day en-CHOO-fay).

They cost about 60 pesos or around 2 USD.

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6 Responses

  1. Thanks for all the wonderful info you’ve posted on your website! I read recently that to travel on the Montevideo buses we will need a card of some kind, that some buses wouldn’t be accepting cash anymore? Is this right? If that’s the case, where can I purchase this card? Many thanks.

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